Resources

Here you’ll find videos, FAQs, a glossary, downloadable resources including a doctor discussion guide, patient brochure, and key facts, as well as information on support groups.

Downloadable resources

Here you’ll find helpful resources, including our doctor discussion guide, patient brochure, and key facts on CKD in T2D.

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Doctor discussion guide

Use our doctor discussion guide to help you get the most out of your next doctor’s visit.

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Patient brochure

Turn to our patient brochure for help understanding how CKD in T2D develops, the importance of getting tested for CKD, and managing CKD.

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Key facts

See key facts on how chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes increases the risk for other serious conditions.

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Videos

Learn about how the kidneys work, how people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) develop chronic kidney disease (CKD), an introduction to kidney dialysis and transplant, and hear from patients living with CKD in T2D.

How kidneys work and CKD in T2D
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Living with CKD and T2D
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CKD diagnosis and testing
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Frequently asked questions

You have questions. We have answers.

High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

The condition

What is the difference between chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes (CKD in T2D), diabetic kidney disease, and diabetic nephropathy?

Chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes (CKD in T2D), diabetic kidney disease, and diabetic nephropathy are different names for the same condition.


High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

Testing

What is the difference between a UACR and an eGFR test?

A UACR test uses a urine sample to determine if the kidneys are damaged by detecting any protein in the urine. An eGFR test uses a blood sample to measure the amount of kidney function.

I get a urine test when I visit my doctor. Is this a UACR?

Not all urine samples are tested for UACR, which is the earliest indicator of kidney damage. Ask your doctor about taking a UACR so you will be able to detect CKD in T2D as early as possible and have time to get ahead of any further damage to your kidneys.

I have my latest lab test results. How do I know if they are good or bad?

A UACR test result:

  • of 30 mg/g or less indicates a normal amount of protein in your urine
  • above 30 mg/g may mean you have kidney damage

An eGFR test result:

  • 60 or higher is in the normal range
  • less than 60 may indicate a loss of kidney function

Speak with your healthcare provider about your test results and next steps. 

How often should I take a UACR test?

You should ask your healthcare provider for a urine test called a UACR test at least once a year, to check for CKD.


High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

Protein in urine

My doctor said that I have “leaky kidneys.” What does this mean?

If your kidneys are damaged by inflammation and scarring, they can’t filter the small proteins, called albumin, out of the blood and protein will “leak” from the kidneys into your urine.

Is it bad to have protein in my urine?

Healthy kidneys don’t allow protein to pass into the urine. Protein in the urine can indicate that your kidneys are not functioning properly and you are at risk for developing CKD.


High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

Risks of developing chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes (CKD in T2D)

I have a relative with CKD in T2D and who is on dialysis. Am I more likely to get CKD?

Family history of kidney disease may increase your risk of developing CKD in T2D.

My blood sugar levels are well controlled. Am I still at risk for CKD in T2D?

Even people with well-controlled blood sugar levels can develop CKD in T2D.

Can high blood pressure increase my risk of CKD in T2D?

High blood pressure can cause CKD and CKD can cause high blood pressure.


High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

Kidney dialysis and kidney transplant

How long does it take somebody diagnosed with CKD to go on dialysis?

You will need to start dialysis when you reach an advanced stage, such as stage 5 CKD. Early detection is important because there are steps you can take to delay progression.

Am I going to end up on dialysis?

CKD in T2D is a chronic disease, which means that it will gradually worsen and you may need kidney dialysis, but there are things you can do to help protect your heart and kidneys, so it is important to get tested early and talk to your doctor about steps you can take to delay progression.

How will I know when it’s time for dialysis?

When you reach stage 5 CKD and your kidneys can no longer function on their own, you will need kidney dialysis or a transplant to live.

Will a kidney transplant cure my CKD?

A kidney transplant won’t cure CKD. There is no cure for CKD. A kidney transplant improves quality of life and helps you live longer.


High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

Symptoms

Can I have CKD in T2D and not feel sick?

There are no signs or symptoms of early CKD in T2D. This is why it’s important to get ahead of any kidney damage. Talk to your doctor about taking a urine test, called a UACR.

What are the signs or symptoms of CKD in T2D?

There usually are no signs or symptoms of CKD in T2D until nearly all kidney function is gone and it is necessary for dialysis or transplant in order to survive. This is why it’s important to get ahead of any kidney damage by taking a urine test, called a UACR, once a year.


High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

Progression of chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes (CKD in T2D)

How can I prevent progression of CKD in T2D?

There are steps you can take to delay progression and prevent further kidney damage. Be sure to talk to your doctor.

How quickly does CKD in T2D progress?

Progression of CKD in T2D depends on many factors and is different for everybody. The earlier you know if you have CKD, the more you can do to delay progression.

Is there a cure for CKD?

Once you develop CKD you cannot cure or reverse it. There are steps you can take to slow the progression of the disease. Be sure to talk to your doctor.

What can I do to keep my kidneys healthy?

There are a number of things you can do to slow the progression of CKD in T2D and maintain your kidney health, including managing other health conditions and making dietary and lifestyle changes.

High blood sugar and chronic kidney disease

Glossary

Here is a list of common terms and acronyms.

BMI                        

Body mass index is a number value of your weight in relation to your height. A BMI between 18.5 and 25 kg/m2 indicates normal weight. A BMI of less than 18.5 kg/m2 is considered underweight. A BMI between 25 kg/m2 and 29.9 kg/m2 is considered overweight. A BMI of 30 kg/m2 and above is considered obese.

CKD

Chronic kidney disease is a condition that causes a gradual loss of kidney function and can lead to serious kidney damage.

CVD

Cardiovascular disease is a condition that leads to problems with your heart and blood vessels.

eGFR

Estimated glomerular filtration rate test is a blood test that measures the amount of kidney damage you may have.

ESKD

End-stage kidney disease occurs when the kidneys stop functioning.

ESRD

End-stage renal disease occurs when the kidneys stop functioning.

UACR

Urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio is a urine test that indicates if kidneys are damaged.

T2D

Type 2 diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood sugar is chronically high.

Nephrologist

A doctor who specializes in kidney diseases.